Three times an immigrant

Panayotis Sfalagakos, December 2014

When delving into the history of modern Greece, one fact that surely stands out in the mind of the student is the recurring theme of emigration and domestic depopulation. At what seem to be almost regular intervals, political, economic, social and other factors and considerations spur a new wave of Greeks to migrate, either internally (from rural to urban areas) or beyond the borders of the country, to foreign lands, both near and far.

Thus, the post-2008 ‘Greek crisis’ period may be viewed as simply constituting but the latest instalment in the history of Greek mass emigration.

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Workshop 1: Greece: From Junta to Crisis

Cultural genealogies and comparative perspectives

This event, organised jointly by the Universities of Birmingham and Oxford with the support of the Hellenic Centre, marked the 40th anniversary since the fall of the junta in Greece and examined how the crisis has led Greeks to rethink political attitudes, cultural discourses and conceptions of identity established since 1974. It took place at the Hellenic Centre in London on Saturday 20 September 2014.

PROGRAMME

SESSION 1: COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES

  • Chair and Response: Professor Jane Cowan (Sussex University)
  • Professor Mark Mazower (Columbia University): The Legacy of the Junta in Comparative Perspective
  • Dr Elisabeth Kirtsoglou (University of Durham): Redde Caesari: Allies, tributaries and political conundrums from a certain anthropological perspective.

SESSION 2: CULTURAL DUALISMS

  • Chair and Response: Professor Kevin Featherstone (LSE)
  • Professor Yannis Stavrakakis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki/Queen Mary, University of London): Cultural Dualism Revisited: Populism, Crisis and National Exceptionalism in Greece and the US
  • Professor Dimitris Tziovas (University of Birmingham): From junta to crisis: Greek culture in perspective

SESSION 3: NARRATIVES OF CRISIS AND PUBLIC SPHERE

  • Chair and Response: Dr Eleftheria Ioannidou (University of Birmingham)
  • Professor Dimitris Papanikolaou (Oxford University): Between the family and the nation: The post-Metapolitefsi Greek public sphere.
  • Professor Antonis Liakos (Athens University): Narratives of the Greek crisis

Closing remarks and roundtable discussion on the crisis with the participation of research students:

Maria Antonopoulou (Birmingham), Chloe Howe-Charalambous (Oxford), Mina Dragouni (UCL), Marina Lambrakis (Oxford), Yannis Stamos (Birmingham).

Chair: Professor Dimitris Papanikolaou